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impacting-gender-diversity-2011.pdf

Impacting Gender Diversity Exploring the challenges and generating strategies for change

October 2011

Foreward by Women & Leadership Australia

Executive summary

Key challenges

Lack of leadership capability, commitment and action

Inflexible work arrangements and misconceptions about workplace flexibility

Uncertainty surrounding appropriate gender diversity KPIs

Strategies for change

No silver bullet but leadership commitment is key

Leadership passion is not enough

Influencing behaviour through KPIs – what gets measured gets done

Making workplace flexibility work

The way forward

Appendices

Workshop process

Deloitte diversity and inclusion business integration wheel

3

4

6

8

11

13

Contents

Impacting Gender Diversity 3

Foreward by Women & Leadership Australia

Research and best practice informs us that gender diversity is a key marker of health and rationality in organisations. The facts are clear: undeniable evidence confirms that companies with a high percentage of women in leadership positions perform better financially. Over the past seven years Women & Leadership Australia (WLA) has been working alongside hundreds of Australian organisations to develop their female talent. It recognises that many organisations are committed to making changes but lack the required knowledge to do so effectively.

Now is a crucial time for making a difference in Australian workplaces. The recent report by Goldman Sachs identifies that by closing the gap between male and female employment rates the implications for the Australian economy would be significant, a boost to the Australian GDP by 11%.

On 30 June 2010 the ASX Corporate Governance Council introduced new guidelines for Australian listed entities to both set measurable objectives for and report on gender diversity. Yet, demands of these external reporting guidelines on Australian workplaces are still not translating into the shifts needed. As of August this year, more than half of the senior executive teams of Australia’s top 200 listed companies remain completely female-free zones. Another alarming indicator is the gender pay divide hit levels as high as 17.5 per cent in May – the largest gap in 23 years. The good news worth considering is that we have seen an overall increase of 51% in female board appointments this year. Although only comprising 12.5% of ASX 200 board members, this is a significant increase.

Motivated by this opportunity, WLA partnered with Deloitte to run a workshop series to look at how gender diversity fits with Australian culture and business. Bringing together significant expertise and research in the field, these workshops created a unique platform for assisting organisations with infiltrating, understanding and leveraging the key elements of engaged diversity.

The events were attended by leading diversity and HR practitioners from local, state and federal government departments, and from from the finance, construction, education and professional sectors. This workshop served as an initial exploration of the primary challenges facing organisations and the key strategies to overcome those challenges. By recognising effective strategies and mapping the collective efforts into a context, the areas most important for action clearly emerged. The participants then focused on crystallizing the challenges and generating options for change.

This focus aligns with WLA’s emphasis on real action and compelling, sustainable change. WLA is driven by a core belief that women represent an enormously under-utilised national resource. Through supporting a greater percentage of talented women to progress into leadership positions, tremendous cultural and economic benefits will follow. Since its inaugural forum in 2003, over 35,000 women have participated in a wide range of programs.

The aim of both the workshops and this subsequent report is to answer the myriad of questions on the lips of Australian employers and equip them with practical, achievable initiatives ready for implementation. WLA is proud to be part of such an important initiative, by partnering with Deloitte and gaining from their expertise and research, this report will become a critical resource in creating a force for change. We welcome the opportunity to continue to develop the tools and imperative for this shift to ensure the Australian business community gains from the under-utilised diverse resources and talents of working people.

Suzi Finkelstein Executive Convenor Women & Leadership Australia

4

There is a lot of noise and activity in Australia at the moment in relation to gender diversity. So what’s working and what’s not? To gain insights from those on the frontline and help accelerate the pace of change, the ‘Impacting Gender Diversity’ workshops, co-hosted by Deloitte and Women & Leadership Australia, were held in Sydney and Melbourne on the 25 and 29 August 2011. These workshops brought together 38 HR and business leaders from the public and private sector to explore challenges for advancing gender diversity within their organisations and equip participants with practical and achievable strategies to address these barriers1.

This report shares the insights of these frontline change agents about (i) organisational challenges; and (ii) practical change strategies. These insights build upon those findings contained in the 2010 Equal Employment Opportunity Network of Australia/Hudson Australasian Diversity & Equality report Looking for a paradigm shift: 2010 Market leader report on diversity and gender2 (the ‘2010 ADES report’) and Deloitte’s broad range of consulting engagements to help companies advance gender diversity.

The prospect of embarking on a program of cultural change may appear daunting. So where to start? To gain clarity on the options, workshop participants were invited to consider the Deloitte Diversity and Inclusion Business Integration Wheel which maps eight key areas linked to creating cultural change. These areas (or segments) identify the way talent is managed and leveraged across an enterprise and range from recruitment and career development to business operations and governance. Participants selected four critical areas for attention in 2011:

1. Lack of leadership commitment, capability and action: Leadership commitment and capability is critical to creating a workplace which embraces diversity and inclusion. While workshop participants suggested that many leaders appear to support the business case for diversity, they also suggested that this belief is not being translated into action to create cultural change. Such change would involve the review and alignment of processes, systems and practices to ensure that

diversity and inclusion are part of ‘business as usual’. Participants also opined that the absence of leadership commitment reflected a lack of understanding by those at the top, including misconceptions about the extent of inequality.

2. Inflexible work practices and misconceptions about workplace flexibility: Advancing gender diversity is strongly linked to flexibility. While most organisations have flexible work policies in place, participants identified that their success is being undermined by a variety of factors such as the ‘traditional’ view of work that remains entrenched in the culture of many organisations; incorrect and unhelpful assumptions about workplace flexibility; and difficulty managing customer, peer and management expectations.

3. Uncertainty surrounding appropriate gender diversity KPIs: The 2010 ADES report and workshop insights indicate that incorporating gender diversity KPIs in managerial reward and recognition programs is a key step towards achieving change. However, uncertainty abounds as to the exact nature of those KPIs, how they might be assessed and to whom they should apply, presenting a real barrier to effective implementation.

4. The ‘one-size-fits-all’ model of career progression: The traditional corporate ladder, assuming linear and vertical career paths, and bias in recruitment and selection processes, including the use of selection criteria which disadvantaged women, was identified by participants as a key barrier to gender diversity.

If cultural change is the goal, these insights give leaders clarity about where to focus their energy and activity. The next question is how? Workshop participants did not suggest that there is a single silver bullet to the advancement of women, but there was agreement about the central importance of leadership. In particular, leadership commitment lies at the heart of creating a diverse and inclusive culture. Critically, it is leaders who will initiate and shape changes to behaviours, systems, processes and practices to ensure alignment with diversity goals.

Executive summary

1 Appendix 1 contains a

summary of the workshop

process. Appendix 2

describes the Deloitte

Diversity and Inclusion

Business Integration Wheel

which helped framed

participants’ thinking.

2 Looking for a paradigm

shift: 2010 Market Leader

report on diversity and

gender (2010) http://www.

eeona.org/ADES_2010_

Report_15_ October_

2010.pdf

Impacting Gender Diversity 5

It is not enough, however, for leaders to simply believe in diversity. There is a strongly held view that they must be proactive, accountable and possess the capabilities of an inclusive leader to truly realise the benefits of diversity. Programs that help leaders understand and address unconscious biases are critical. Likewise, appropriate incentive programs linking gender diversity KPIs, such as the attrition rates of men and women in comparable positions, to rewards and promotional opportunities will all help build and sustain inclusive capabilities.

Leadership support also plays a critical role in ensuring the success of workplace flexibility policies and practices. Among other things, leaders play an integral role in bridging the expectation gap between the flexible worker and their customers, clients, and colleagues. In addition, these programs must be open to everyone (not just women); accompanied by consistent communication about the two-way benefits of flexibility; and supported by performance systems that neutralise the effect of flexible work arrangements. But more than just flexibility in when and where work is performed, organisations must move beyond the traditional corporate ladder structure and embrace customised career-paths for individual employees – both men and women.

The new ASX diversity reporting guidelines have thrown the spotlight on gender diversity, driving action in many organisations. But there is still much to be achieved. This report consolidates what we know about the challenges and provide leaders with practical strategies for change to help the advancement of women within their organisation.

Leadership commitment lies at the heart of creating a diverse and inclusive culture. Critically, it is leaders who will initiate and shape changes to behaviours, systems, processes and practices to ensure alignment with diversity goals.

Culture

Leadership

Governance

Vision and strategy

Business operations

Work environment

Performance and reward

Career development

Attraction and retention

Ta le

nt

Enterprise

6

Key challenges

1. Lack of leadership commitment, capability and action relating to diversity According to the 2010 ADES report, senior leadership commitment and a strong diversity and equality culture are the most important conditions necessary for advancing gender diversity within an organisation. Workshop participants endorsed this finding and suggested that a lack of leadership commitment and failure to perceive diversity as a business priority are key roadblocks to integrating diversity into business processes. From these insights, it is clear that building a diverse and inclusive organisation can only succeed with the support of top management.

Participants noted that while many leaders appear to ‘accept’ the business case for diversity, this belief is not being translated into action. Other participants reported that there is a lack of understanding of the gender diversity issue by leaders, and/or an assumption that the organisation is performing well in this area. The consequence of either case

is that leaders have little incentive to resource and sponsor diversity and inclusion strategies within the organisation and in particular to embark on a program of cultural change.

Finally, workshop participants suggested that gender diversity is inhibited by unconscious bias and a misunderstanding of what diversity actually means.

2. Inflexible work practices and misconceptions about workplace flexibility Participants suggested that achieving gender diversity is strongly linked to an effective flexible work program, yet many face challenges implementing such initiatives.

For example, the traditional approach to work (i.e. set hours and location) and the ‘anywhere, anytime3’ mode of operation remain entrenched in the culture of many organisations and serves to inhibit flexibility, especially at senior levels.

Misconceptions about workplace flexibility also persist. Notably, the belief that employees working flexibly are less productive and the assumption that the benefits of flexibility are skewed one way in that employees get the primary benefit (work/life balance) and employers the secondary benefit (retention). Participants endorsed the findings of a global IBM study of 25,000 employees in 75 countries which showed that employees working flexibly experienced less work/life conflict and were able to work longer hours – from half a day to two days per week – before experiencing work/life difficulty compared to those with traditional work arrangements4.

Participants also highlighted the challenges that flexible workers face in managing customer/client, peer and management expectations.

65%Cultural readiness

Conditions necessary for success Source: ADES 2010 survey

Clear performace targets and measurement processes

Good information and reporting systems

Strong equality and diversity culture

CEO champion

Demonstrable leadership commitment

The availability of role models

Managerial skills

% of respondents who agreed

35%

63%

71%

61%

76%

65%

60%

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80%

Key challenges identified by participants: 1. Lack of leadership commitment, capability and action 2. Inflexible work practices and misconceptions about workplace flexibility 3. Uncertainty surrounding appropriate gender diversity KPIs 4. The ‘one-size-fits-all’ model of career progression

3 ‘Women Matter: Women

at the top of corporations:

Making it happen,’ (2010),

McKinsey & Company.

4 Hill, E. J., Erickson, J.J., Holmes,

K.E. and Ferris, M. (2010),

‘Workplace flexibility, work

hours and work-life conflict:

Finding an extra day or two,’

Journal of Family Psychology,

Vol 24(3), pp 349–358.

Impacting Gender Diversity 7

Others identified that certain, well-accepted work practices pose a challenge for career progression such as important networking events that are commonly held outside of work hours.

3. Uncertainty surrounding appropriate gender diversity KPIs The 2010 ADES report highlights the importance of creating managerial accountability for diversity, as well as rewards for good practice. Yet according to a survey by the Australian Human Resource Institute, fewer than one in five CEOs and executives have gender equity KPIs and more than 60% of senior and middle management are without accountability in the area. Moreover, less than 20% of CEOs and executives had KPIs in the area linked to bonus payments and only 15% of senior managers and 10% of middle management had KPIs linked to bonuses5.

While participants agreed that incorporating gender diversity KPIs into managerial reward and recognition programs is a key step towards achieving change, many were unsure about the form these performance indicators should take and to whom they should apply. Concern was also expressed about the lack of robust data against which to assess the performance of leaders and managers and the potential subjectivity of such evaluations.

4. The ‘one-size-fits-all’ model of career progression Despite a changing world of work, the traditional corporate ladder remains the model rooted in many organisations. These organisations promote a ‘one-size-fits-all’ model of career progression with success defined as a linear, vertical climb to the top6. Not surprisingly given the 2010 ADES report findings on the importance of career redesign in facilitating gender diversity, workshop participants also identified the lack of career flexibility inherent in the traditional career model as a key barrier to the advancement of women. This model provides little room for employees taking career breaks, such as paternity leave, seeking lateral moves within an organisation to better manage family/work life conflict or to move between line and support roles over the course of a career.

Participants also identified bias in recruitment and promotion processes as a key barrier to advancing gender diversity. Bias can manifest itself through the use of selection criteria weighted towards stereotypically masculine characteristics and entrenched views about the experience required for career progression – for example, the requirement to have had an overseas posting or to have previously held a frontline position before moving into management. Taken together, the traditional corporate ladder and assumptions about leadership experience can serve to disadvantage employees with ‘non-traditional’ career paths.

5 ‘Gender Equity in the

Workplace: Research Report,’

(2011), Australian Human

Resources Institute.

6 Benko, C. & Anderson, A.,

(2010), ‘The Corporate Lattice:

Achieving High Performance

in the Changing World of

Work’, Harvard Business

Review Press.

8

Strategies for change Having identified the key organisational challenges to advancing gender diversity, workshop participants showcased and brainstormed practical solutions. The strategies for change below include those identified by the HR and business leaders at the workshops, and also draws on the findings contained in the 2010 ADES report and Deloitte’s broad range of consulting engagements to help companies advance gender diversity.

No silver bullet, but leadership commitment is key It is clear that building a diverse and inclusive organisation can only succeed with the support of top management. So how can change agents foster this commitment?

Connect diversity to business drivers and success As a starting point, leaders must be able to connect diversity to business drivers and success. Yet according to a 2011 Forbes Insight survey of 300 multi-national executives, many leaders are not equipped with the insights needed to recognise the benefits of a diverse workforce. Specifically, 41% of respondents identified the ‘failure to perceive the connection between diversity and business drivers’ as a barrier to developing and implementing a diversity strategy.

Workshop participants agreed that to create a deep commitment to diversity, leaders must move beyond the headlines of the business case and understand the detail. This includes having a clear understanding of diversity; if ‘diversity’ is understood in terms of gender or EEO only, resistance may arise. Moreover, greater diversity alone will not necessarily deliver positive business outcomes – diversity must be leveraged in some way. Ultimately, the case rests on understanding that diversity means more than having a sprinkle of women and a dab of colour, and that the value of diversity rests in developing an inclusive workplace7.

Customise the business case The multi-faceted nature of the business case offers change agents a multitude of ‘pressure points’ to garner leadership buy-in. Hence, careful consideration should be given to creating a tailored business case for the individual organisation based on individual business needs.

For example, in Australia, the mining sector will need an additional labour force of 58,000 simply to maintain current levels of production making attracting and retaining talent from non-traditional labour sources imperative8. Retail and consumer goods businesses will require a diverse workforce to understand and create affinity with an increasingly multicultural and multifaceted consumer base. And for organisations dependent on innovation for future success, diversity of perspective is a critical execution tool.

While it is assumed that social responsibility and value based arguments for diversity are less compelling than profit-oriented ones, findings from US-based group Catalyst suggest this may be incorrect. According to the 2009 report ‘Engaging men in gender initiatives: what change agents need to know’, appealing to the ‘higher ideals’ of male leaders and pro-social concerns about the ‘greater good’ can play a role in men’s desire to create more inclusive workplaces9.

Need for heavy weight champions The identification of diversity champions at senior levels can help change agents win wider support and enthusiasm for diversity. As an added benefit, having these ambassadors of change throughout the organisation provides a way of ensuring that momentum does not rest on a single individual10.

So how can these powerful champions be identified? One perspective offered by the Catalyst research is that men who displayed a stronger sense of fair play (i.e. those who expressed broad concern about issues of fairness and the distribution of resources in society) were significantly more likely than others to be identified as champions of gender equality within their companies.

Information is power Before individuals can support a change initiative, they must first be convinced that there is something wrong with the status quo11. While many organisations collect some data on diversity, few track the results in enough detail to enable the true dimensions of inequality in the workforce to be understood12.

7 ‘Only skin deep?

Re-examining the business

case for diversity,’ (2011),

Deloitte.

8 Tracking the Trends 2011’,

(2011), Deloitte.

9 ‘Engaging men in gender

initiatives: what change

agents need to know’,

(2009), Catalyst, USA.

10 The 2010 ADES report.

11 Frederick A. Miller, ‘Strategic

Culture Change: The Door to

Achieving High Performance

and Inclusion,’ Public

Personnel Management, vol.

27, no. 2 (Summer 1998):

p. 151–160; Daniel T. Holt,

Achilles A. Armenakis,

Hubert S. Feild, and Stanley

G. Harris, “Readiness for

Organizational Change:

The Systematic Development

of a Scale,” The Journal of

Applied Behavioral Science,

vol. 43, no. 2 (June 2007):

p. 232–255; Molly Carnes,

Jo Handelsman, and Jennifer

Sheridan, ”Diversity in

Academic Medicine: The

Stages of Change Model,”

Journal of Women’s Health,

vol. 14, no. 6 (July/August

2005): p. 471–475.

12 Changing companies’

minds about Women, 2011,

McKinsey Quarterly.

Impacting Gender Diversity 9

The collection of timely and appropriate data relating to the progress of women can help leaders to gain a real understanding of what is going on within the organisation and address misconceptions regarding merit and equality.

So what data is most powerful in bringing about a mindset shift? According to the 2010 ADES report, a pay equity analysis is the most effective initiative in advancing women, presumably because such data provides a truth point about the value placed on men and women by the organisation. Employee engagement surveys analysed by gender also provide evidence to leaders on the inclusiveness or otherwise of the work culture.

Importantly, data analysis can be used to identify unconscious biases in the recruitment, development and promotion processes. For example, despite perceptions of meritocracy, a recent talent profile analysis undertaken by a major legal services firm found that only 27% of its senior women lawyers were considered ‘exceptional’ in 2010, despite making up 60% of senior lawyers overall. As the Human Resources Director noted “this is a good example of the impact in the talent process statistics [have had] and there have been similar impacts in relation to salary and bonuses. We all thought we were incredibly fair and then we tested our data against gender, age and full-time vs part-time. Simply instituting a process to test the data has been enough to get people to stop, think and test their decision-making. We didn’t realise we could be making biased decisions.” Having the data enabled leaders within the firm to re-assess their decision- making. The result? In 2011, 45% of the lawyers considered ‘exceptional’ were women13.

Some HR and business leaders at the workshops also noted that providing leaders with benchmarking statistics, comparative competitive data and case studies have proved effective in gathering momentum and support for diversity and inclusion strategies.

Making it real Finally, to help leaders understand how to build diversity into the fabric of a workplace, it is critical to analyse behaviours, processes and systems for

misalignment with diversity objectives. Do selection processes, for example, facilitate access to a broad pool of talent or do they unintentionally overlook certain groups? Do promotion processes seem fair, but do they privilege employees who can fulfil unwritten or old-fashioned criteria? Consulting with employees about the practical application of policies and processes will provide organisation specific insights. To help accelerate this process workshop participants shared their views about the priority areas for change, namely KPIs, flexibility and career redesign. These insights were supported by the 2010 ADES report which found that a focus on work and career design were highly effective strategies to advance gender diversity.

When passion is not enough It is not enough for leaders to simply believe in diversity. They must be active, accountable and have the capabilities to ensure the benefits of diversity are achieved. This calls for inclusive leaders who:

• Visibly champion diversity and drive initiatives • Create an environment which is open and inclusive • Demonstrate a collaborative leadership style • Embody merit-based decision-making • Seek out and value employees’ contributions • Create a sense of collective identity/shared goals

within the team • Possess cultural competency • Have the ability to actively manage conflict given

different perspectives.

As a critical step, leaders must understand and address unconscious biases which can influence perceptions and behaviour and undermine even the most robust diversity strategies. By addressing biases, leaders can positively influence the talent pipeline by creating a work environment where merit-based, rational decisions are made.

Influencing behaviour through KPIs: what gets measured gets done But how can leaders be encouraged to demonstrate inclusive behaviours? While training and development helps equip leaders with the capabilities, establishing gender equity KPIs and linking these to rewards and promotional opportunities provide real incentives for behavioural change.

13 Refer: http://www.deloitte.

com/view/en_AU/au/

services/consulting/human

capital/Diversityandinclusion

/9f230382dc461310VgnVCM

1000001a56f00aRCRD.htm

10

As with the development of any other KPI, gender diversity KPIs should:

• Be consistent with the organisation’s strategy and supported by top management

• Be multifaceted – for example, include short term and long term, quantitative and qualitative indicators

• Have consistent concepts and definitions applied across the broader organisation to ensure comparability and fairness

• Be based on accurate and timely data • Be linked to promotion and development

opportunities • Be transparent with high levels of performance,

publicly rewarded and recognised.

To this end, relevant metrics could include:

• % females and other diverse groups in specific business units

• Inclusiveness as measured through a diversity audit • Attrition/retention rates of men and women in

comparable positions • Pay equity • Promotion rates by gender • Diversity and inclusion skills building initatives.

Making workplace flexibility work Workshop participants suggested that there are a number of conditions that are critical to the success of workplace flexibility initiatives, which are consistent with Deloitte’s own experience. Firstly, leaders play a critical role in ensuring the effective implementation of flexible work policies. In essence, leaders provide the critical link between an organisational policy that promotes workplace flexibility and day-to-day practice. When employees make use of flexible work arrangements they must do so within a supportive workplace culture manifested by positive (and practical) managerial support and a lack of negative consequences for the employee using the flexible work arrangement. Attention must therefore be given to ensuring that leaders have a high level of knowledge about flexibility, the confidence to manage difficult issues that may arise including ‘schedule creep’ (e.g. where part-time schedule creeps back towards full-time).

Secondly, to be effective, workplace flexibility must be open to anyone – not just women. Yet a recent study of 2300 employees working in large organisations in six countries found that men still perceive work/life programs as primarily serving the needs of women, which causes a lower take-up of work/life options by men14. This is despite men’s and women’s needs and perspectives being more alike than different. Likewise, Australian research into ‘What men want’ found that more men would take up flexible work options if it weren’t for the stigma attached15.

Thirdly, performance systems must be reviewed to ensure the impact on individuals working flexibly is neutralised; for example, by ensuring individuals are measured by output, and not hours of work.

Finally, adaptations to work practices may also be necessary to support the organisation’s flexibility practices. For example, when team meetings and social and networking events are scheduled needs to be considered.

From ladder to lattice organisations Achieving change requires more than just flexibility in terms of when and where work is performed. Workshop participants suggested career redesign is a key part of cultural change. But what does that mean in practice? Participants suggested that it will be different for each organisation but the starting point is identifying the criteria for career progression and reconsidering if they have a disparate and unreasonable impact on women. For example, are there embedded assumptions about the value of a linear and lock-step career path? Is there the capacity for employees to move in and out of line and support roles? Lattice organisations ‘recognise that 21st century career journeys will ebb and flow over time and in tandem with life’s circumstances – resulting in a need for a new model of how careers are built16.’ The corporate lattice model depicts employees’ career paths as multidirectional, with moves across as well as up and down. Importantly, it recognises that there is no one universal view of career success but rather a multiplicity of ways to get ahead and have a successful career. Moreover the lattice model sees business value in employees gaining experience across the diverse areas of business operation, rather than according to siloed career paths.

14 Global Study on Men and

Work-Life Integration (2011),

WFD Consulting, www.

wfd.com/news/ register-

gms2011.html.

15 Men at work: What they

want and Why it matters

for women, 2011,

The 100% Project.

16 2010, The Corporate Lattice.

Impacting Gender Diversity 11

The new ASX diversity reporting guidelines have thrown the spotlight on gender diversity and are driving action in many organisations. But there is still much to be achieved. For many diversity and HR advocates, gaining leadership commitment remains the key stumbling block. And in an increasingly global, fast-paced and complex market, it is these organisations that risk being left behind.

For those leaders already committed to diversity, the challenge is to create cultural change by aligning work practices, processes and systems, as well as individual behaviours, with diversity objectives. In particular, the change agents who participated in the Deloitte/WLA workshops suggested that the way forward rests on building leadership capability, including an understanding of unconscious bias, implementing effective and consequential KPIs, addressing misconceptions about workplace flexibility and focusing on career redesign. In essence it is now about doing the hard work of cultural change. Eminently achievable with dedicated commitment – and assisted by the insights shared in this report.

The way forward

12

Impacting Gender Diversity 13

The workshops were structured in three parts. Part 1 re-examined the business case for diversity and identified some key principles that help make sense of the evidence supporting the case, including the definition of diversity and the connection between diversity and inclusion.

In Part 2 of the workshop, the findings from the 2010 EEONA/Hudson Australasian Diversity and Equality Survey (ADES) ‘Looking for a paradigm shift: 2010 Market leader report on diversity and gender’ were presented. Specific emphasis was given to approaches adopted by the ‘best of the best’ organisations in relation to gender diversity.

The final part of the workshops utilised the World Café methodology to create a living network of conversation. Using the Deloitte diversity and inclusion business integration wheel17 as a reference point, participants explored the key challenges to advancing gender diversity and discussed strategies for overcoming these within their own organisations. These are discussed in detail in sections 2 and 3 of this report.

Appendix 1: Workshop process

17 Refer Appendix 2.

Re-examining the business case for diversity

Learning from the ‘best of the best’

Exploring the challenges and generating strategies for progress

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

14

Impacting Gender Diversity 15

The Deloitte diversity and inclusion business integration wheel shows the elements of a business that influence diversity and inclusion outcomes and aims to assist organisations identify opportunities for workplace change.

Segments on the left side of the wheel focus on the employee experience of key organisational practices and processes, while segments on the right side identify the business ‘architecture’ that fundamentally shapes the way the organisation approaches diversity and inclusion.

Appendix 2: The Deloitte diversity and inclusion business integration wheel

Culture

Leadership

Governance

Vision and strategy

Business operations

Work environment

Performance and reward

Career development

Attraction and retention

C ap

ab ili

ty

C om

m it

m en

t A

cc ou

nt ab

ili ty

Co m

m un

ic at

io n

V is

ib le

s up

po rt

Va lu

es Be

ha vio

ur

Bo ard

ef fec

tiv en

es s

Va lue

s & CS

R

Str uct

ure s

Pol icie

s

Met rics

Accou ntabi

lity

Risk ma nageme

nt

Compliance

Reporting

Vision & mission

Strategic objectives Improvement initiatives

Business planning Industry landscape

Brand & reputation

Communications

Custom ers

Distribution channels

Products & services

Processes

Inform ation &

technology

O rganisation

Supply chain

Physical locations

M arketing

Su pp

or t

st ru

ct ur

es

Jo b

de si

gn

N et

w or

ki ng

Fl ex

ib ili

ty

W or

kl oa

d &

h ou

rs

So ci

al e

ve nt

s

W or

k pr

ac tic

es

W or

ki ng

c on

di tio

ns

Ex pe

ct at

io ns

Pr oc

es s d

es ign

& to

ols

Inc en

tiv e s

tru ctu

re

Rew ard

& rec

og nit

ion

Rem une

rati on

& b ene

fits Feedb

ackP romot

ion cri teria

Performa nce appra

isal Goal-setting & KPIs

Competency framework

Advancement & promotion

Job rotation

Assignment allocation

Internal mobility

Sponsorship & mentoring

Career customisation

Succession planning

Talent management

Learning & development

Process design & tools

Exiting

O nboarding

Em ploym

ent offer

D ecision-m

akers Selection criteria

M essages &

signals R

ecruitm ent channels

Talent pool

Ta le

nt

Enterprise

The Deloitte diversity and inclusion business integration wheel

R esearch &

developm ent

Juliet Bourke – Partner Human Capital Consulting Sydney, Australia Tel: +61 (0) 2 9322 7379 [email protected]

Sandy Caspi Sable – Director Human Capital Consulting Melbourne, Australia Tel: +61 (0) 3 9671 7461 [email protected]

Bernadette Dillon – Director Human Capital Consulting Melbourne, Australia Tel: +61 (0) 3 9671 7604 [email protected]

Suzi Finkelstein – Executive Convenor Women & Leadership Australia Workplace Training Advisory of Australia Tel: 1 300 138 037 [email protected]

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www.deloitte.com.au

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