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405030.pdf

Graded Project

Menu Project

INTRODUCTION 1

PART 1: ESSAY 1

PART 2: CREATING A MENU 1

PREPARING YOUR PROJECT 3

Food Groups 4 Calories 6 Vitamins and Fiber 7 Serving Sizes 9 Sample Menu 12

SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS 15

Grading Criteria 15 Submitting Online 15 Submitting by Mail 16

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Menu Project

INTRODUCTION

This project contains two parts. First, you’ll research and discuss food safety, including sanitation requirements, food storage, preparation, and proper food handling, as well as presentations that make food appetizing for children. Second, you’ll be required to create a one-week menu, including snacks, for your selected age group following the food guide now known as “Choose My Plate.” We’ve included images of the traditional food pyramid and the new “Choose My Plate” plan for you to use as a reference, but you may wish to refer to the ChooseMyPlate.gov Web site for more detailed information.

PART 1: ESSAY

Food safety sanitation requirements, storage, preparation, proper food handling, and presentation are the first steps in ensuring proper diet and nutrition for a child’s health and welfare. Using the Internet, research proper methods for each of these areas for your chosen age group and then write a 400–500 word essay about what you’ve learned. Make sure you’ve used your own words or used proper citations, if quoting directly. Include a Works Cited page for any Web sites you’ve consulted. Name your file using your student information, like this: student number_exam number_ last name_ first name. The exam number for this project is 405030.

PART 2: CREATING A MENU

For this part of your project, you’ll select an age group for which you’ll plan a week’s menu that includes three meals a day, plus snacks. See Figures 1 and 2, which illustrate the older food guide pyramid and the simpler Choose My Plate food guide, which shows the proportions of a child’s plate to be filled with each food group.

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FIGURE 1—The USDA food pyramid shows the propor- tion of foods from each food group to be eaten daily. From left, the sections represent grains, vegetables, fruits, dairy, and protein.

FIGURE 2—Choose My Plate simplifies choosing the right proportions of foods by showing that half of the daily diet should comprise vegetables and fruit and the other half grains and protein, with the emphasis on vegeta- bles and grains. The circle represents milk or other dairy products.

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On your submission, be sure to clearly identify the age group you’ve selected. The age groups for this project are

• Children 1–2 years old

• Children 3–5 years old

After carefully reviewing the nutritional information included in this booklet, you’ll use the menu template provided to create a five-day menu for your chosen age group. Take into account the nutritional needs (calories, recommended dietary intake, and food sources for vitamins, minerals, and nutrients) for the age group you’re working with. We’ve included a sample menu with one day’s menu completed to show you how it should look.

PREPARING YOUR PROJECT

When you’ve completed your essay and planned your menu for all five days in the age group you’ve chosen, you’ll transfer your menu information onto the menu template. To do so, go to your student portal and locate the Word file titled “Menu Project Template.” Copy and paste the menu template into the same document as your Part 1 essay. Title the menu “Part 2: Creating a Menu.” Using the sample menu as a guide, complete your menu and save your file.

When you’ve completed both the essay and the menu, check them carefully for errors. Run the spell check and grammar check, and pay attention to the red and green lines that mark possible errors. However, you must also proofread for errors that the computer doesn’t pick up, such as mistakes in grammar and missing or misused words or punctuation.

Note: If you can’t copy the menu template from the Word file, you may photocopy the template included in this project booklet and mail your project to the school. Make sure your menu is neat and legible.

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Food Groups To make knowledgeable selections, you need to know what’s included in each food group. Here are the basic components of each food group, although you may find additional options during your research.

Protein

Protein builds up, maintains, and replaces the tissues in your body. Some protein foods are highly allergenic; find out if children in your group have allergies.

Note: Take special care with children who are allergic to eggs, nuts, or other foods.

The following protein foods may be used as part of a health- ful menu:

• Beef

• Poultry

• Fish

• Eggs

• Nuts and seeds

• Beans and peas (black beans, split peas)

• Lentils

• Tofu

• Veggie burgers

Grains

Whole-grain products such as whole-wheat bread, oatmeal, and brown rice are recommended because they have more fiber and help provide feelings of fullness.

Note: Avoid sugary cereals.

Choose from the following grain-based foods as part of a healthful menu plan:

• Bread

• Cereal

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• Rice

• Tortillas

• Pasta

Dairy

Using the Choose My Plate guidelines, the dairy circle could be fulfilled with up to a cup of milk at each serving (depending on age), but you also can use yogurt or cheese for dairy serv- ings. Choose low-fat or nonfat dairy most of the time for children over two years of age.

Note: The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends whole milk for children 1–2 years of age.

The following dairy-based foods may be part of a healthful menu plan:

• Milk

• Yogurt

• Cheese

• Fortified soy milk

Fruits

Fruit servings may be fresh, frozen, or dried, but fresh is always the best choice. Try to avoid using canned fruits packed in syrup, as they contain too much sugar. If you must use canned fruit, choose the kind that’s packed in juice without added sugar.

Note: Many children have allergies to strawberries and bananas, as well as other, more exotic fruits.

Vegetables

Once again, fresh is best! Frozen is a good second choice, but canned vegetables are often loaded with salt. Look for low- salt or salt-free varieties if you must buy canned vegetables.

Note: Vegetables are a great source of vitamins, so children should be encouraged to try as many as possible.

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Calories Are calories bad for you? No. Your body needs calories for energy. But eating too many calories—or the wrong kind of calories—and not burning enough of them through activity can lead to unhealthy weight gain. In addition, a steady diet of the wrong kinds of foods begins a lifelong destructive pattern that leads to obesity and poor health.

Most foods and drinks contain calories. Some foods, such as lettuce, contain few calories (1 cup of shredded lettuce has less than 10 calories). Other foods, like peanuts, contain a lot of calories (1⁄2 cup of peanuts has 427 calories). Children need a healthful balance of calories and nutrition.

Kids’ Favorites

Many adults watch their calories if they’re trying to lose weight, but most active kids don’t need to do this; however, all kids can benefit from eating a healthy, balanced diet that includes the right number of calories—not too many and not too few. Unfortunately, the kinds of foods kids love to eat may be so high in calories, fat, and sodium that the bad outweighs the good. For example, macaroni and cheese, grilled cheese sandwiches, and chicken tenders with fries have long been favorites of children and staple foods in daycares and homes alike. But here are some startling numbers that should have you rethinking those menus:

• The average serving of macaroni and cheese has 800 calories and contains 810 milligrams of sodium and 48 grams of fat.

• A grilled cheese sandwich with fries contains 1,020 calories and averages 2,170 milligrams of sodium and 54 grams of fat.

• Chicken fingers with fries contain 1,030 calories, 2,170 milligrams of sodium, and 54 grams of fat.

For preschoolers, one of these meals contains almost a full day’s calories, more than a full day’s worth of fat, and up to twice the adequate intake level of sodium. Whole-grain pasta with tomato sauce, low-fat cheese on toasted (not grilled) whole-wheat bread, and baked chicken with oven fries are good substitutes for the high-calorie foods listed.

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Caloric Needs of Children

On the average, preschool children ages 1–3 need 900–1,000 calories a day. Children ages 4–8 need up to 1,400 calories. Height, growth rates, and activity levels will affect individual requirements. To ensure proper caloric intake and to maintain proper nutrition, a child should eat the following every day:

• Five servings of fruits and vegetables

• At least one food rich in vitamin C

• At least one food rich in vitamin A

• At least one food that’s high in fiber

• Two servings of protein, such as meat, fish, or eggs, or alternative protein, such as beans, tofu, or nuts

Vitamins and Fiber

There are 13 recognized vitamins, which must be obtained in food, since, with a few exceptions, they can’t be synthesized by the human body. Most vitamins are involved in growth and metabolism functions, so they’re vital to the health of young children. Fiber, while not a nutrient, assists in digestion by absorbing water and providing bulk.

Vitamin C

Sources of vitamin C include the following:

• Oranges

• Tomatoes

• Strawberries

• Grapefruit

• Cabbage

• Cauliflower

• Greens (spinach, kale)

• Broccoli

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• Sweet peppers

• Tangerines

Vitamin A

Sources of vitamin A include the following:

• Cantaloupe

• Pumpkin

• Carrots

• Sweet potatoes

• Spinach

• Apricots

• Broccoli

• Winter squash

• Watermelon

Fiber

Sources of fiber include the following:

• Cereals

• Bananas

• Raisins

• Oatmeal

• Macaroni

• Crackers

• Apples (with skin)

• Whole-wheat bread

• Baked potatoes (with skin)

• Pinto beans

• Green beans

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Serving Sizes

Standard serving sizes are suggested based on the typical child’s needs. Refer to this section when planning your menu.

Suggested Serving Sizes for Children Ages 1–2

• Milk/juice = 1⁄2 cup

• Vegetable or fruit = 1⁄2 cup

• Meat or protein alternative = 1⁄2 ounce for a snack and 1 ounce for lunch and dinner

• Bread = 1⁄2 slice

Suggested Serving Sizes for Children Ages 3–5

• Milk/juice = 3⁄4 cup

• Vegetable or fruit = 1⁄2 cup

• Meat or protein alternative = 1⁄2 ounce for a snack and 11⁄2 ounce for lunch and dinner

• Bread = 1⁄2 slice

Suggested Serving Sizes for Children Ages 6–12

• Milk/juice = 1 cup

• Vegetable or fruit = 3⁄4 cup

• Meat or protein alternative = 1 ounce for a snack and 2 ounces for lunch and dinner

• Bread = 1 slice

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BREAD/BREAD ALTERNATE REQUIREMENTS FOR CACFP Serving Size for 1–5 year old children = 1⁄2 serving Serving Size for 6–12 year old children = 1 serving

GROUP A MINIMUM SERVING SIZE FOR GROUP A

Bread-type coating Breadsticks (hard) Chow mein noodles Crackers (saltines and snack crackers) Croutons Pretzels (hard) Stuffing (dry) Note: Weights apply to bread in stuffing

1⁄2 serving = 10 grams or 0.4 ounces 1 serving = 20 grams or 0.7 ounces

GROUP B MINIMUM SERVING SIZE FOR GROUP B

Bagels Batter-type coating Biscuits Breads (white, wheat, whole wheat,

French, Italian) Buns (hamburger or hot dog) Crackers (graham crackers—all shapes,

animal crackers) Egg roll skins English muffins Pita bread (white, wheat, whole wheat) Pizza crust Pretzels (soft) Rolls (white, wheat, whole wheat, potato) Tortillas (wheat or corn) Tortilla chips (wheat or corn) Taco shells

1⁄2 serving = 13 grams or 0.5 ounces 1 serving = 25 grams or 0.9 ounces

GROUP C MINIMUM SERVING SIZE FOR GROUP C

Cookies (plain)* Cornbread Corn muffins Croissants Pancakes Pie crust (dessert pies*, fruit turnovers**,

and meat/meat alternate pies) Waffles

1⁄2 serving = 16 grams or 0.6 ounces 1 serving = 31 grams or 1.1 ounces

GROUP D MINIMUM SERVING SIZE FOR GROUP D

Donuts (cake and yeast-raised, unfrosted)** Granola bars (plain)** Muffins (all except corn) Sweet roll (unfrosted)** Toaster pastry (unfrosted)

1⁄2 serving = 25 grams or 0.9 ounces 1 serving = 50 grams or 1.8 ounces

* Snack only

** Snack and breakfast only

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GROUP E MINIMUM SERVING SIZE FOR GROUP E

Cookies* (with nuts, raisins, chocolate pieces, and/or fruit purees)

Donuts (cake and yeast-raised, frosted or glazed)**

French toast Grain fruit bars** Granola bars (with nuts, raisins, chocolate pieces and/or fruit)** Sweet rolls (frosted)** Toaster pastry (frosted)**

1⁄2 serving = 31 grams or 1.1 ounces 1 serving = 63 grams or 2.2 ounces

GROUP F MINIMUM SERVING SIZE FOR GROUP F

Cake (plain, unfrosted)* Coffee cake**

1⁄2 serving = 38 grams or 1⁄3 ounce 1 serving = 75 grams or 2.7 ounces

GROUP G MINIMUM SERVING SIZE FOR GROUP G

Brownies (plain)* Cake (all varieties, frosted)*

1⁄2 serving = 58 grams or 2.0 ounces 1 serving = 115 grams or 4.0 ounces

GROUP H MINIMUM SERVING SIZE FOR GROUP H

Barley Breakfast cereals (cooked—whole grain, enriched, or fortified) Bulgur or cracked wheat Macaroni (all shapes) Noodles (all varieties) Pasta (all shapes) Ravioli (noodle only) Rice (enriched white or brown)

1 serving = 1⁄2 cup cooked or 25 grams dry

GROUP I MINIMUM SERVING SIZE FOR GROUP I

Ready-to-eat breakfast cereal (cold, dry— whole grain, enriched, or fortified)

1 serving = 3⁄4 cup or 1.0 ounce, whichever is less

* Snack only

** Snack and breakfast only

BREAD/BREAD ALTERNATE REQUIREMENTS FOR CACFP Serving Size for 1–5 year old children = 1⁄2 serving Serving Size for 6–12 year old children = 1 serving

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Sample Menu

For this sample menu, we chose ages 6–12 and filled in only one day of the week. You’ll be required to not only choose an age group, but also fill in each day, Monday through Friday, to complete your project.

Form Menu for Age Group ___6–12___

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

Breakfast

• Milk

• Bread

• Fruit/Vegetable

1 cup 2% milk 3⁄4 cup oat cereal 3⁄4 cup sliced fruit

Snack

• Bread

• Fruit/Vegetable or Milk

2.2 ounces granola 3⁄4 cup apple juice

Lunch

• Milk

• Bread

• Fruit/Vegetable

• Fruit/Vegetable

• Protein

1 cup 2% milk 1⁄2 cup pasta 3⁄4 cup green salad with salad dressing 3⁄4 cup fruit salad

(2) 1-ounce chicken meatballs

Afternoon Snack

• Bread

• Fruit/Vegetable or Milk

2.2 ounce oatmeal cookie 3⁄4 cup raisins

(Continued)

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Form Menu for Age Group ___6–12___

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

Evening Meal

• Milk

• Bread

• Fruit/Vegetable

• Fruit/Vegetable

• Protein

1 cup 2% milk 1⁄2 cup brown rice

1 cup mixed vegetables (stir fry)

2 ounces beef

Evening Snack

• Bread

• Fruit/Vegetable or Milk

1 slice banana bread

1 cup 2% milk

When you’re ready to complete your menu, go to your student portal and locate the Word file of the Menu Project template. Copy the template and paste it at the end of your essay docu- ment. Then fill in your menu information. As you type your menu into the template, the spaces will expand to fit your material.

If you’re unable to copy and paste the template electroni- cally, you may use the printed template on page 14 and mail in your project. You may want to make extra photocopies of the template page, in case you need them.

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Form Menu for Age Group ______

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

Breakfast

• Milk

• Bread

• Fruit/Vegetable

Snack

• Bread

• Fruit/Vegetable or Milk

Lunch

• Milk

• Bread

• Fruit/Vegetable

• Fruit/Vegetable

• Protein

Afternoon Snack

• Bread

• Fruit/Vegetable or Milk

Evening Meal

• Milk

• Bread

• Fruit/Vegetable

• Fruit/Vegetable

• Protein

Evening Snack

• Bread

• Fruit/Vegetable or Milk

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SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS

When you’ve completed both the essay and the menu, submit them to the school for evaluation. You may upload your file online or mail a printed copy of your essay and menu to the school for grading.

Grading Criteria

Your project will be evaluated according to the following criteria:

• The contents of your essay

• Menu completeness and appropriateness for the age group

• Accuracy of all content

• Organization of information

• Development of sentences and paragraphs

• Accuracy of spelling, punctuation, and grammar

Submitting Online

If you’re submitting your assignment online, be sure to include both the essay and the menu in a single file, named using your student information as instructed. There’s no need to attach an answer sheet if you submit your project online; the subject-matter specialist who evaluates your project will provide one.

Follow this procedure to submit your assignment online:

1. On your computer, save revised and corrected versions of your essay and menu, naming the file using the following information: student number_exam number_last name _first name.

2. Go to http://www.takeexamsonline.com and log in.

3. Go to My Courses.

4. Click on Take Exam next to the lesson you’re working on.

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5. Enter your e-mail address in the box provided. (Note: This information is required for online submission.)

6. Attach your file or files as follows:

a. Click on the Browse box.

b. Locate the file you wish to attach.

c. Double-click on the file.

d. Click on Upload File.

7. Click on Submit Files.

8. You’ll receive an e-mail within 24 hours that tells you the exam has been received. It will say “RCD” on your record next to that exam until a grade is posted.

9. Exams are evaluated within 5 days of receipt, although many times they’re evaluated sooner.

10. You can see the evaluation and exam with comments from an instructor by clicking on View Exam Results once you see your grade posted.

Submitting by Mail

If you choose to print and mail in your project for evaluation, you’ll need to include the answer sheet found at the end of this booklet. Carefully prepare your files and proofread them after printing. Use the following address if you choose to mail the project:

Penn Foster Student Service Center 925 Oak Street Scranton, PA 18515-001

The Penn Foster Student Service Center is under contract with Penn Foster College.

NAME ________________________________________________________________

ADDRESS ________________________________________________________________

CITY ________________________________________________________________

p Check if this is a new address

PHONE

PLEASE PRINT

FOR YOUR INSTRUCTOR’S USE GRADE GRADED BY

ANSWER SHEET

STUDENT NUMBER:

STATE/PROVINCE ZIP/POSTAL CODE

EXAMINATION NUMBER 40503000

Menu Project

Early Childhood Education

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Your instructor will use the following rubric to grade your project.

Menu Project

Grading Criteria Exemplary Proficient Fair Poor Not

Evident

Essay: includes information on food safety, sanitation, require- ments, storage, preparation, proper food handling, and presentation. Sources are appropriately cited.

40 39–30 29–20 19–10 0

Grammar, punctuation, and format (10 points)

10 8 6 4 0

Menu: Age group is clearly identified.

10 8 6 4 0

Menu is complete and varied. 20 19–15 14–10 9–5 0

Serving sizes are appropriate for age group selected.

20 19–15 14–10 9–5 0