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JWI 510: Leadership in the 21st Century Lecture Notes

© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. JWI 510 – Lecture Notes (1194) Page 1 of 3

Week 2: Defining Effective Leadership

Welcome to Week 2 of our course. Hopefully, by now, you are feeling more confident about navigating the virtual classroom and have a better sense of the goals and requirements of this course.

Much has been written about leadership that reinforces the myth of the great leader – a superhero-like individual who can conquer any crisis, and who goes into daily battle for their team. We wrongly assume that leadership can be simplified to great strategy, inspiring oratory, personal charisma, and unparalleled intelligence. While these strengths are admirable, nothing is more important than execution. The best leaders can combine the work of individuals into a collective, unified effort and mobilize them to achieve great results.

Jack’s 8 Rules of Leadership

In Winning, Jack says that leaders must:

1. Relentlessly upgrade their team as they recruit and develop superb people, and then make full use of every opportunity to coach, evaluate, and build self-confidence

2. Instill the company’s vision, ensuring that everyone understands, lives, and breathes the vision, and create a reward system to encourage and reinforce desired behaviors

3. Spread energy and optimism

4. Establish a relationship of trust with their people by being candid and transparent, keeping promises, and giving full credit to others for their accomplishments

5. Have the courage to make unpopular decisions when they are required, and make gut calls, even when they may not have all the information they would like to have

6. Probe and push to make sure their questions are answered with action

7. Inspire appropriate risk-taking by creating a culture that embraces it, while always making sure they learn from mistakes

8. Celebrate achievements as often as they can

As you consider Jack's Rules, you are advised to approach these as principles – in other words, as just the right things to do. Being a leader means having the courage to make hard decisions. A leader must be able to speak, not just about what they want to change, but to take action – leading by example and creating a safe environment for others to grow. Successful leaders must first build the right social architecture, which includes designing the organization properly. They need to put the right people in the right jobs, so that great teams multiply.

JWI 510: Leadership in the 21st Century Lecture Notes

© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. JWI 510 – Lecture Notes (1194) Page 2 of 3

Leaders keep teams focused on the targets, the mission, and the prize. It is all too easy, particularly when team members are talented, for people to compete with one another for the leader’s favor, for the next promotion, and for the biggest bonus. So, leaders must establish a culture that makes it unacceptable for team members to engage in dysfunctional competition. Many effective leaders believe they are on a mission. Their sense of purpose is inspirational. They see what they are doing as being vitally important, and they let this message ring loud and clear throughout their organizations, communicating it over and over again to their employees, until it hits home. This focus on mission inspires their teams to dream big dreams and to achieve exceptional results. Great leaders never allow teams to become complacent. The best teams always sense that there is an enemy out there, even if their own company is number one in an area of business. As Andy Grove, Intel’s former CEO, said in his book, Only the Paranoid Survive, “Business success contains the seeds of its own destruction. The more successful you are, the more people want a chunk of your business, and then another chunk, and then another, until there is nothing left” (Grove, 1996). Great leaders never let their people lose sight of that reality. When we think of the Sistine Chapel, we think of Michelangelo when, in fact, it took thirteen other artists and hundreds of artisans to help him make this masterpiece. Walt Disney worked with over 200 illustrators and artists to achieve his dreams. He personally focused on finding and developing talent, and then on setting up a school to teach his teams how to animate films. Leadership is about more than one person; it is about vision and collaboration.

Leadership versus Management People use the terms leadership and management interchangeably. They are actually different – but interrelated – practices that lie at the heart of successful organizations.

Management involves three tasks:

1. Planning and budgeting.

2. Organizing and staffing.

3. Controlling performance by tracking it against a company’s plans, while problem-solving to correct performance issues.

These activities – if done right – will hopefully lead to results that are on time and on budget. However, even after proper planning, the unexpected often happens.

JWI 510: Leadership in the 21st Century Lecture Notes

© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. JWI 510 – Lecture Notes (1194) Page 3 of 3

Leadership stands apart for three reasons:

1. Leadership is about establishing direction, creating a vision of the future, and designing the strategies to get there. Leaders think long-term; they think big.

2. Leadership galvanizes people to action. Leaders communicate the vision and all its supporting strategies in ways that others truly understand, believe in, and own. They align their people together in healthy and productive ways. They put a lid on turf wars that can slowly tear down the company, and they break down functional silos that keep smart people apart.

3. Day in and day out, leadership is about motivating, inspiring, and energizing individuals and teams, so that employees understand what their roles are and what success looks like if they do their jobs properly. Leaders give the work meaning and purpose. They make it make sense.

Just as management produces predictability, consistency, order, and control in an organization, leadership creates movement and adaptability. Adaptability helps organizations come to grips with changing environments and new markets, competitors, customers, and products. Ultimately, leadership is about producing positive change.

Your Leadership Journey

• If you are new to leadership, consider how the definitions of leadership we are considering can guide your development.

• If you are a team leader, consider whether you are a stronger manager or leader.

• If you are a senior/veteran leader, consider Jack’s “Rules” and what embracing them can do for you and for leaders of teams who report to you.