RevisedPDFSyllabusSummerTermA2020Wolfcopy.pdf

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Miami Dade College-Kendall Campus

English & Communications Department

Fundamentals of Speech Communication Syllabus SPC1017 Summer Term A 2020

Professor: James C. Wolf Course: SPC 1017 Email: [email protected] Class Dates: June 1, to July 10. 2020 Required Textbook: Choices & Connections, 3rd Edition, Bedford/St. Martin’s (Macmillan Learning) Steven McCormack, Joseph Ortiz – with Launchpad Access

Other Required Material: Computer, notebook paper, ink pens and pencils, 4 X 6 index cards, and A POSITIVE ATTITUDE!

Preface to Students: You may be asking yourself the question, “What am I getting myself into?” This class is called: Fundamentals of Speech Communication 1017. You will be making a number of presentations this semester. You may be uncertain about what a speech presentation is…. so, what is a presentation anyway? There are many things that a presentation is not, but it is mainly not about you alone “making a speech.”

You are only part of the process of “making a speech!” Your audience is also the “other part” of your “speech.” Every speech you give this semester has two things happening simultaneously:

1. You, the speaker, are making a commitment to your audience that you can help them learn new information, solve a problem, or show them how to do something they need to know how to do.

2. Your audience, meanwhile, is making a judgment on the value and validity of your promise.

By the end of your speech, your audience should say, “I see what you mean, I agree.” Every speech you give begins with your audience! Your audience needs something—usually help solving a problem, inspiration, or advice about changing their personal lives for the better. As a speaker you help your audience to narrow their options or arrive at a conclusion that you believe in, based on their needs, wants and expectations. Your next step is. . .

1. Read this entire syllabus before beginning any assignments! 2. Check the Schedule of Assignments Calendar: Summer Term A 2020 (pages 17, 18 and 19).

Ú Preview of your “Schedule of Assignments Calendar” ç

ü The far-right column of this “Class Events Calendar” (textbook & syllabus reading assignments) lists your textbook AND specific syllabus reference pages that supplement each outline and delivery assignment.

ü The due date for each assignment is clearly listed in the second far-left column. ü Each assignment this semester is described on pages 4, 5, 6 and 7 of this syllabus. ü Read the assigned chapter/pages in your textbook. Next, review the description of “class events”

column, and review your syllabus reading pages, including the syllabus sample speeches and templates. Finally, make certain that you understand the due dates for each assignment!

3. As you start working each assignment, review your textbook reading assignments, then flip

to the specific suggested assignment descriptions in this syllabus. Next, add your own notes and ideas about how to put together your upcoming speaking assignment.

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Course Description/Course Objectives: SPC 1017 (3 Credits): This course provides students with the oral communication skills necessary for success in personal, professional and educational settings. Students will learn, through study and experiential practice, skills relating to interpersonal communication, presentational speaking and group dynamics of communication, and be able to use them effectively. This is a Gordon Rule course. Additional resources: The Speech lab is an essential resource for this course. It is located on campus in room 2207. The Virtual On Line Speech Lab: The speech lab on-line is easy to find. Just paste the link listed below in your browser, click on Kendall Campus, and a link for the Speech Lab will appear. Once you click on that link, you will be taken to the Speech Lab Blackboard Collaborate page where you can get the help of a tutor. Here’s the link: https://libraryguides.mdc.edu/BbLTutoring

If you would like to see an 8-minute Speech Lab orientation video please click on the following link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWfVXlcouao

Grading Policies: In order to pass the class, you must earn your grade by completing assignments in a way that demonstrates your college-level speaking, writing, and thinking skills. For successful completion of SPC1017, you must score enough points on each assignment to achieve a 60% minimum in the course. Grading: Course final grades will be based on 3 total outline grades and student typed autobiography. Your final grade will be determined by total points you earned during the semester, divided by the total points possible for that semester. Missed or incomplete presentations, assignments and examinations will receive grades of zero (0), which will be computed in your final average grade. Also, attendance affects your final grade (see the Attendance Policy).

Course Grading Scale:

90-100 points = A 80-89 = B 70-79 = C 60-69 = D Below 60 = F

Attendance Policy:

Attendance Policy: On line attendance (at least two times per week) is required for the successful completion of this course. Students are allowed two absences without a point deduction. If you have not emailed me or logged into Blackboard at least two times during the week, you will be marked absent. AFTER THE SECOND ABSENCE, POINTS WILL BE DEDUCTED FROM YOUR FINAL COURSE GRADE as follows:

1 to 2 Absences: No problem ˜˜ 3 Absences: Lose one-half letter grade from final grade ˜˜˜ 4 Absences: Lose one letter grade from final grade ˜˜˜˜ 5 Absences: Lose two letter grades from final grade ˜˜˜˜˜ 6 Absences: Fail the class ˜˜˜˜˜˜

Students who have not signed in to Blackboard, emailed me, or submitted their first speech outline, will be purged as “no shows” on the appropriate class roll. It is your responsibility to ensure that you are properly registered or withdrawn from this course (via the Registrar) and that you have read and understood all the first day handouts

A Special Note: This is a six-week version of a four-month course. It is intensive! Therefore, complete all assignments as specified in the syllabus Calendar of Events, on time. Do not procrastinate. All assignments will be due on time, no exceptions. If you need my help, please e-mail me at [email protected] You may also visit our Virtual Speech Lab for individual help and advice: https://libraryguides.mdc.edu/BbLTutoring. Let’s make this a great semester.

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SPC 1017 Learning Modules

This Course Consists of Four (4) Learning Modules:

Module (1) Submission of your typed autobiography: (500 to 1,000 words). See syllabus calendar schedule of assignments and due dates. Module (2) Speaking to inform: See syllabus calendar schedule of assignments and due dates. Module (3) Speaking to Persuade: See syllabus calendar schedule of assignments and due dates. Module (4) Monroe’s Motivated Sequence Final Persuasive Speech: See syllabus calendar schedule of assignments and due dates.

ü When you have read the textbook pages assigned to each Module, you should complete the

following at the end of each chapter: The Chapter Review and the Pop Quiz. You should also access Launchpad to view the video clips and other supplementary support materials available.

ü Students will create a full-sentence speech outline for Modules 2, 3, & 4 (see syllabus calendar schedule of assignments for due dates)

ü Students should consult the Virtual Speech Lab to have their full-sentence speech outlines reviewed and checked for Modules 2, 3 & 4. It is important for you to receive feedback before you practice delivering your completed speech outline to the Lab, or email your final speech outline draft to your instructor for grading.

ü After consulting with the speech lab, students are required to email their speech outlines to their professor. Students will be graded on their submitted emailed speech outlines.

ü Students are also required to practice delivering the final draft of their speeches to the Virtual Speech Lab tutors. The Speech Lab will evaluate student speeches, complete a Virtual Speech Lab Completion Rubric, and the completed rubrics will be emailed to students as an image file. The Virtual Speech Lab Completion Rubric” must be emailed, along with the full-sentence speech outline, to [email protected] by the due date.

ü Students who do not submit their speech lab “Virtual Speech Completion Rubric” on the assigned date will have their speech outline grade reduced by 10 points. NO EXCEPTIONS.

ü Students who do not submit their speech outlines on the assigned date will receive a grade of zero (0) for that assignment.

ü Course final grade will be based on total outline grades and student typed autobiography.

How the Virtual Speech Lab operates:

The speech lab will view student outlines and speeches through Blackboard Collaborate. The speech lab also has a page where students can upload recorded speeches that the tutors can access and view. Speech lab tutors can watch the speech with the student so he or she could see for themselves how they did. The speech lab is easy to find online. Here’s the link: https://libraryguides.mdc.edu/BbLTutoring. The speech lab hours are: Monday – Thursday 8am – 7pm, and Friday 8am – 3pm

Communication: You will be expected to check your e-mail often. E-mail is how the professor will communicate with you. When emailing the professor, remember to always use your MDC e-mail, sign your name at the bottom, AND put the dates and time of your class. You may also contact the professor by email. Once you have sent e-mail or left a message, the professor will get back to you within 24 hours. Assignment Policy: A weekly assignment calendar is listed in this syllabus for you to follow. The calendar will have a schedule of dates when all assignments and lab work are due,

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All assignments are due on the date noted on the calendar. Incomplete work will result in a grade of zero for the assignment. Late speech outline submissions are unacceptable and may only be made up later at the discretion of the professor. Proper documentation, such as a doctor’s note, may also be requested. Plagiarism: Is always a serious matter and will result in an F grade for that speech assignment. Do not copy or cut-and-paste outlines off the Internet. Please consult the professor or the Speech Lab if you are unsure what constitutes plagiarism.

Module (1): Required Student Autobiography: (100 points possible)

Students are to submit a typed autobiography (500 to 1,000 words—or--two to four typed pages). Use a 12-font minimum, and single-space within paragraphs, double-space between paragraphs.

Please pay particular attention to events in your life that seem like: Turning points. events that have prompted fundamental decisions about the importance of ideas that you hold, the things you value, or the behaviors you advocate.

Autobiography Guidelines: The speech topics that you select this semester should be based on your unique personal experiences. Accordingly, the topics you choose should be based on your life experiences, your values, and your overall passions and convictions. Writing your autography (or life story) will reveal a whole array of individual values and help you to discover your passions and convictions. Each of us has something unique to say based on our rich and diverse experiences. In your autobiography, please answer the following three questions:

1. What single value is so important that you would teach it to your children as the most important foundation of a happy life? Why?

2. What condition(s) in your chosen future major, job or career would you change? Why? and How? (Example: you want to become a Special Needs Teacher. What would you like to change about this career/discipline? Why?)

3. What is the most important social issue we have to deal with as a community (world, nation, state) and how would you correct it?

Answering the above questions should reveal some of you real convictions and help you to choose topics based on your particular makeup and unique life experiences!

Autobiography Grading Guidelines

¨ Shows excellent insight. 90-100 points = A ¨ Shows good insight. 80-89 = B ¨ Shows some insight. 70-79 = C ¨ Superficial & sketchy 60-69 = D ¨ Autobiography not submitted Below 60 points = F

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Module (2): Informative Speech Outline: Should Be Submitted for Review to Speech Lab in Blackboard

100 points possible. Speech length: 4 to 5 minutes

1. Pick a speech topic designed to inform an audience about a person, place, animal or thing. Consult your Autobiography and your textbook (pp. 318 – 321) for possible topics. Some examples of topics: People: Abraham Lincoln, Mary Todd; Places: Rome, Italy, Barcelona, Spain; Animals: lions, spiders; Things: robots, volcanoes.

2. Students should consult the Virtual Speech Lab to have their speech outlines checked for Module 2.

3. Include at least one citation of a source of research (logos) in your outline, and include one statement of ethos (personal credibility) where indicated in the outline. Citation(s) should include who said what, and when. For example: “According to Ann Johnson’s book, How to Get the Job (2012), you should wear professional clothing to a job interview.”

4. Consult your textbook on the pages listed in the course calendar, and follow the outline template and sample speech in this syllabus carefully when you construct your speech outline.

Module (2): Informative Speech Practice Delivery Must Be Presented to Speech Lab in Blackboard: (Speech Time: 4 to 5 minutes)

1. Deliver a speech designed to inform your audience about a person, place, animal or thing. Your speech will be delivered to the Virtual Speech Lab.

2. Your speech should be based on the outline you submitted for review to the Speech Lab. Any errors, confusion or concerns should be cleared up before you present your speech to the Lab. Once you complete the actual presentation, the Lab will issue a Completion Rubric, which you will submit with your speech outline to the professor.

3. Speaking notes: You should use 4 X 6 note cards. Do not use your typed outline! Speeches that are “read” will receive an F for eye contact!

4. Be sure to cite your research orally during the speech, using the format described above. 5. Be professionally dressed. 6. Email your typed outline to professor on due date. If a typed outline is not submitted to the

professor on the due date, you will receive an F for that assignment. Failure to submit the Virtual Speech Lab Completion Rubric to the professor will result in a deduction of 10 points from your final outline grade.

Module (3): Persuasive Speech Outline: Should Be Submitted for Review to Speech Lab in Blackboard

100 Points Possible. Speech length: 3 to 4 minutes

1. Choose a topic that you feel strongly about. Consult your Autobiography and your textbook (pp. 429 – 432) for possible persuasive propositions. Some possible topics: Capital punishment is not a deterrent to crime; You should learn to scuba dive for a hobby; Parrots make wonderful pets; You should consider acupuncture when you are sick or in pain; Vote in the next presidential election; Sign an organ donor card today.

2. Students should consult the Virtual Speech Lab to have their speech outlines checked for Module 3.

3. Include at least two citations of a source of research (logos) in your outline, and include one statement of ethos (personal credibility) where indicated in the outline. Citations should include who said what, and when. For example: “According to Ann Johnson’s book, How to Get the Job (2012), you should wear professional clothing to a job interview.”

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4. Consult your textbook on the pages listed in the course calendar, and follow carefully the outline template and sample speech in this syllabus when you construct your speech outline.

Module (3): Persuasive Speech Practice Delivery Must Be Presented to the Virtual Speech Lab in Blackboard: (Speech Time: 3 to 4 minutes)

1. Deliver a speech designed to persuade your audience about something you feel

strongly about. Your speech will be delivered to the Speech Lab. 2. Your speech should be based on the outline you submitted for review to the Speech Lab.

Any errors, confusion or concerns should be cleared up before you present your speech to the Lab. Once you complete the actual presentation, the Lab will issue a Completion Rubric, which you will submit with your speech outline to the professor.

3. Speaking notes: You should use 4 X 6 note cards. Do not use your typed outline! Speeches that are “read” will receive an F for eye contact!

4. Be sure to cite your research orally during the speech, using the format described above. 7. Be professionally dressed. 8. Email your typed outline to professor on due date. If a typed outline is not submitted to the

professor on the due date, you will receive an F for that assignment. Failure to submit the Virtual Speech Lab Completion Rubric to the professor will result in a deduction of 10 points from your final outline grade.

Module (4) Monroe’s Motivated Sequence Persuasive Speech Outline:

Should be Submitted for Review to Speech Lab in Blackboard 200 points possible; (double grade). Speech Length: 4 to 6 minutes

Professor Alan H. Monroe developed this very popular method to convince others to change their opinions or behaviors. Speakers have used this method of persuasion for over eighty years!

1. Choose a topic that you feel strongly about. This is a persuasive speech, so the same types

of topics you considered for Module 3 could be considered for this project. Just don’t do the exact same topic you chose for Module 3.

2. Students should consult the Virtual Speech Lab to have their speech outlines checked for Module 4.

3. Cite evidence as required in the Monroe’s Motivated Sequence outline template and sample speech included in the syllabus. Consult your textbook and the outline template and sample speech in this syllabus, and follow the format carefully when you construct your speech outline. Monroe’s Sequence steps must be followed in the order you see in the syllabus.

Module (4) Monroe’s Motivated Sequence Persuasive Speech Practice Delivery Must Be Presented to Speech Lab in Blackboard: (Speech Time: 4 to 6 minutes)

1. Deliver a speech designed to persuade your audience about something you feel strongly about. Your speech will be delivered to the Speech Lab.

2. Your speech should be based on the outline you submitted for review to the Speech Lab. Any errors, confusion or concerns should be cleared up before you present your speech to the Lab. Once you complete the actual presentation, the Lab will issue a Completion Rubric, which you will submit with your speech outline to the professor.

3. Speaking notes: You should use 4 X 6 note cards. Do not use your typed outline! Speeches that are “read” will receive an F for eye contact!

4. Be sure to cite all evidence orally during the speech, using the format previously described for any research (logos) you do.

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9. Be professionally dressed. 10. Email your typed outline to professor on due date. If a typed outline is not submitted to the

professor on the due date, you will receive an F for that assignment. Failure to submit the Virtual Speech Lab Completion Rubric to the professor will result in a deduction of 10 points from your final outline grade.

Your practice speech lab presentation should follow the following five steps. Be sure to

review and incorporate the outline format included in this syllabus.

1. Attention Step: You need to get the attention of your audience. 2. Need Step: Show the listeners there is a serious problem and something must be done

about it. Here is a good place to include research (logos). 3. Satisfaction Step: Tell your audience how to meet the need or solve the problem. 4. Visualization Step: Get your audience to “see” the benefits of your solution. 5. Action Step: Encourage your audience to take a specific action or actions (Note:

Speakers often use imperative verbs in this part of their presentations.) Remember to use a strong final sentence, also known as a “call to action”).

Grading: Required Speech Outlines: There will be a total of three (3) speech outlines due this semester. Your typed speech outline will be factored into your total course grade. The overall evaluation of your speech outline will be graded as follows:

(5) = Excellent (4) = Good (3) = Acceptable (4) = Fair (1) = Poor

90-100 = A 80-89 = B 70-79 = C 60-69 = D 0-59 = F

Informative Speech Template Outline (This is a typical format for a 3-point, full-sentence, informative speech outline)

Name: Specific Informative Purpose: To inform my audience about_______________________.

Introduction

I. Gain attention: II. Speech thesis: III. Establish credibility: IV. Preview: 1.

2. 3.

Transition to Body of Speech:

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Body I. First main point: A.

1 2..

B. 1.

2. C. etcetera (note: the amount of supporting material you include will depend on your

speech time allotted for the presentation), Transition to second main section: ______________________________________ II. Second main point: A.

1 2..

B. 1.

2. C. etcetera

Transition to third main section: ________________________________________ III. Third main point: A.

1 2..

B. 1.

2. C. etcetera

Transition to Conclusion: ___________________________________________________

Conclusion I. Summary of Speech: II. Restatement of Thesis II. Final Memorable Remarks: _________________________________________________

References Cited: List all sources cited in MLA format. 1. 2. 3. Etcetera

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Sample 3-Point, Full-Sentence Informative Speech Outline

Name: Imma Student Specific Informative Purpose: To inform my audience about the dangers and prevention of lightning strikes

INTRODUCTION

I. It might be beautiful to watch, but it can kill you! Every year, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (2020), it kills at least sixty people in the United States and causes brain damage in hundreds of others. What do you think I am talking about? I am talking about lightning!

II. It is important to understand the dangers of lightning, and to protect ourselves from being struck.

III. One of my family members was non-fatally struck by lightning. As a result, I have done extensive research in this area. I am also taking courses in meteorology.

IV. Today, I am going to talk about three aspects of lightning.

A. First, I’ll explain the reasons why people get struck by lightning, both outdoors and

indoors. B. Second, I’ll teach you how to avoid being struck by lightning while outside. C. And third, I’ll share expert advice about safety tips to follow indoors during a storm.

So, to begin, let’s look at why people get killed or hurt by lightning.

BODY OF SPEECH

I. Why people are injured or killed by lightning. A. Outdoors

1. They get caught in a storm and can’t get to a safe place. 2. Another reason people get struck is that they wait too long before getting to a safe

place. 3. And third, people get hit because they don’t wait until it’s safe to leave their shelters.

B. Inside their homes

1. People get struck inside their homes if they are using electrical appliances. 2. People get struck inside their homes it they are using plumbing fixtures during a

storm. Transition: Now you understand how people get hit by lightning. So how can you avoid being a victim of a lightning attack? First let’s talk about what to do if you’re outside.

II. Outdoor safety tips during a lightning storm.

A. The most important thing is to have a lightning safety plan and decide in advance where you’ll go if you get caught in a storm. 1. The safest place is inside a fully enclosed building. 2. Get inside a car or truck. 3. Stay there until it’s safe to come out.

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B. Story about family member who was non-fatally struck by lightning.

C. Second, you should monitor the weather, especially during the summer, the peak season for lightning strikes. 1. Look for signs of a storm before planning an outdoor activity. 2. If you see any flashes of lightning, you shouldn’t go out.

D. Third, as soon as you hear thunder, get to a safe shelter and stay there for at least thirty minutes after the thunder finally stops. Remember this slogan: “When thunder roars, go indoors!” 1. Let me show you a lightning safety poster I found online at the National Weather Service

Website (www.weather.gov.) (Show poster to audience) 2. Don’t come out until thirty minutes after the thunder stops. It’s better to be safe than

sorry!

Transition: You now know how to avoid being hit by lightning if you’re caught outside in a storm. Let’s continue by learning safety tips to follow if you’re indoors during a lightning storm.

III. First, don’t use any electrical appliances. A. Don’t use any electrical appliances.

1. Don’t use an oven. 2. Turn off your computer. 3. Don’t talk on a phone with a telephone cord.

a. Cordless phones are safe. b. Cell phones are safe.

B. Be sure to unplug electrical equipment before the storm arrives. 1. Lamps. 2. Televisions. 3. Toasters. 4. Stereos.

C. Don’t touch any electrical cords during the storm. D. Avoid running water/plumbing.

1. Don’t take a shower. 2. Don’t wash your hands. 3. Don’t wash any dishes.

Transition: Now that you know how to stay safe indoors during a lightning storm, our investigation into lightning safety is complete.

CONCLUSION

I. You should now understand three important aspects about lightning safety. A. First, why people get struck by lightning. B. Second, how to avoid being struck by lightning while outside. C. And third, safety tips to follow indoors during a storm.

II. Remember: Lightning may be beautiful, but it can also be deadly! III. Keep in mind; an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. You’ll live a long and happy if you follow the experts’ advice: (Hold up the poster again.) When thunder roars, stay indoors! ______________________________________

References Cited: (List all sources consulted/cited in MLA format). 1. 2. etcetera

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Persuasive Speech Template Outline (This is a typical format for a 3-point, full-sentence, persuasive speech outline)

Name: Specific Persuasive Purpose: To persuade my audience that/to_______________________.

Introduction

I. Gain attention: II. Speech thesis: III. Establish credibility: III. Preview: 1.

2. 3.

Transition to Body of Speech:

Body I. First main point: A.

1 2..

B. 1.

2. C. etcetera (note: the amount of supporting material you include will depend on your

speech time allotted for the presentation),

Transition to second main section: ______________________________________ II. Second main point: A.

1 2..

B. 1.

2. C. etcetera

Transition to third main section: ________________________________________ III. Third main point: A.

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1 2.

B. 1.

2. C. etcetera

Transition to Conclusion: ___________________________________________________

Conclusion I. Summary of Speech: II. Restatement of Thesis II. Final Memorable Remarks: _________________________________________________

References Cited: List all sources cited in MLA format.

1. 2. 3. Etcetera

Sample Persuasive 3-Point, Full-Sentence Speech Outline

Name: Imma Student Specific Persuasive Purpose: To persuade my audience to take precautionary steps to reduce the risk of skin cancer and other skin-related health issues.

FOR REST OF CONTENT, PLEASE SEE TEXTBOOK PP. 364 – 367, PROTECT THE LARGEST ORGAN IN YOUR LIFE. This sample speech is a 4-point …