Safeguarding Children

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Handbooklevel6.docx

BSc Health and Social Care and BSc Professional Studies

Module Code: HLT 7011

Safeguarding Children

MODULE GUIDE

2018/2019

Semester 1

Level HE6

Contents 1. Overview 3 2. Learning and Teaching Strategy 3 3. Graduate Attributes 4 4. Module Communications 4 5. Module Description 4 6. Learning Outcomes and Assessment 5 7. Assessment Deadlines 5 8. Assignment feedback 5 9. Module Calendar 6 10. Formative Assessment 7 11. Indicative Reading: 7 12. Guidelines for the Preparation and Submission of Written Assignments: 9 14. Academic Misconduct and Referencing 13 15. Assessments 13

1. Overview

Module Tutor: Katie Bannister

Room: T3-40

Tel: 01204 903865

Email: [email protected]

Level: HE6

Credits: 20

Module Pre-requisites: none

Web-link to Module Specification: https://modules.bolton.ac.uk/HLT6027

Web-link to Moodle Class: http://moodle2.bolton.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=6552

2. Learning and Teaching Strategy

This module has been designed to deliver effective learning and teaching to you both as a student but also as an individual working in practice. The 200 notional hours are delivered by a number of strategies that are effective and popular with our students. These include classroom work with formal lectures incorporating discussion and debate in addressing core concepts and interactive learning activities. In addition we aim to meet your individual learning needs by providing scheduled tutorial support where you can meet with the module tutor to discuss aspects of your studies and receive personalised advice and guidance. E learning is also provided via Moodle to enable you to undertake further study in a place and at a time that is convenient to you.

Fitness to Practice: Confidentiality

The University applies its Fitness to Practice Procedure to all students following programmes of study accredited by professional, statutory or regulatory bodies which require the University to make a ‘fitness to practice’ or equivalent declaration or where a student subject to professional code of conduct is undertaking a relevant programme of continuing professional development. The procedure can be found at:

https://www.bolton.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Fitness-to-Practise-Procedure-2018-19.pdf

Confidentiality

You must always protect the identity of patients, clients, colleagues and their relatives in all assignments. Wherever possible you should also make efforts to anonymise organisations, colleagues and individuals. However, the work based context of some modules, means that this is not always possible, but please ensure that any individuals are not recognisable within any of your assignments. Please note that Service Users have the right to refuse student care, and intervention should only occur through informed consent.

3. Graduate Attributes

Graduate attributes are the personal qualities and skills which the University of Bolton community values, and which a student is expected develop during their time at the University. Graduate attributes act as a point of reference for a student’s personal development and support the articulation of employability and transferable skills.

In total there are 10 graduate attributes. This module seeks to support the development of:

· Effective communication

· Collaboration

4. Module Communications

The Module Tutor’s contact details are provided at the top of this page. You must check your University of Bolton email address and the Moodle area dedicated to this module regularly as many module communications are channelled through these mediums.

Your Module Tutor will normally aim to respond to your email messages within 2 full working days of receipt; however responses will be longer in holiday periods.

5. Module Description

This module is aimed at professionals who work with children particularly those of you working in early years, health, social care and education. The purpose of this module is to equip you with knowledge that will help you to identify and fulfil your safeguarding responsibilities effectively. This is particularly important within the changing context of law, policy and service development. It may be taken as a stand-alone module, a BSc Professional Studies module, or as part of the Specialist Community Public Health Nursing or Early Years Top Up programme. In the university setting learning is shared with students studying at Postgraduate level. The module also aims to promote inter-professional understanding of multi-agency and multi-disciplinary working in the field of safeguarding children.

In studying this module you will be preparing for future studies featuring the key specialist areas of marketing the event product and the critical subject area of sustainable operations, which needs to be an essential inclusion in the development of any successful event worldwide, and which is now becoming of central concern to worldwide socio-cultural developments and national governmental policy.

6. Learning Outcomes and Assessment

Learning outcome

Assessment

1 Demonstrate in-depth knowledge and critical awareness of the concept of safeguarding children

Assessment 1

2 Critically analyse and critically evaluate definitions, indicators & signs of child abuse

Assessment 1

3 Critically apply the policies that underpin your role in the recognition of and response to child abuse

Assessment 1

4 Critically analyse the factors that inhibit and assist partnership working when safeguarding children, suggesting how safeguarding practice may be enhanced.

Assessment 1

7. Assessment Deadlines

Assessment item

Due Date

Weight

1

Assignment

7th January 2019

100%

8. Assignment feedback

Feedback on items of assessment can be formal (such as on a signed feedback form) or informal (such as advice from a tutor in a tutorial). Feedback is therefore not just your grade or the comments written on your feedback form, it is advice you get from your tutor and sometimes your peers about how your work is progressing, how well you have done, what further actions you might take.

We recognise the value of prompt feedback on work submitted. Other than in exceptional circumstances (such as might be caused by staff illness), you can expect your assignment work to be marked and feedback provided not less than 15 working days from the deadline date. However, please note that that such feedback will be provisional and unconfirmed until the Assessment Board has met and may therefore be subject to change.

Please take time you read/listen to your assessment feedback. This can be very useful in determining your strengths and key areas for development, and can therefore help you improve on future grades.

9. Module Calendar

Session

Date

Topic/ Content

1

25.9.18

Introduction to module, learning outcomes and assignment brief.

2

02.10.18

History of child abuse.

Evolution of concepts of child abuse.

professional roles and responsibilities and partnership working

3

09.10.18

Categories, indicators and explanations of child abuse.

Partnership working and professional responsibilities

4

16.10.18

Physical abuse and assignment guidance.

5

23.10.18

Neglect.

6

30.10.18

Emotional abuse.

7

06.11.18

Sexual abuse

8

13.11.18

Group work - professional responsibility/supervision Policy and legislation

Formative submission

9

20.11.18

Group work and feedback – policy and legislation

10

27.11.18

Domestic abuse

11

04.12.18

Guest speaker- FGM/ child trafficking

12

11.12.18

Work towards assignments

18.12.18

Individual tutorials- please book a slot

13

25.12.18

01.01.19

Christmas Holidays

07.01.19

(Monday)

Assignment submission

Drop in tutorials room T3-40

14

15.01.19

Individual tutorials

15

21.01.19

(Monday)

Submission of extensions

Drop in tutorials room T3-40

16

25.9.18

Introduction to module, learning outcomes and assignment brief.

NB: Please note that this module calendar may be subject to change.

10. Formative Assessment

Formative assessment is an important aid to learning. It is designed to provide you with feedback on your progress and inform development. It can be used to identify any areas which would benefit from extra attention on your part, or extra support from your tutor. It does not contribute to the overall formal assessment for the module.

You will submit the introduction to your assignment along with a plan for the rest of your assignment meeting all the learning outcomes for your formative assessment.

Formative assessment is a systematic and planned assessment that you are expected to undertake and to receive feedback on, but is not considered at an assessment board and is not subject to internal or external moderation.

Formative Submission Date: 13th November 2018 by midnight via Turnitin

Informal formative assessment is provided in this module through:

· Induction – Introductory diagnostic hand-written assessment

· Group activities and discussion

· Day visits to events/Guest speakers

· Tutorial (Group & Individual) feedback on assessment drafts

· IT and research skills workshops

11. Indicative Reading:

Broadhurst, K., Grover, C. & Jamieson, J. (2009) Critical Perspectives on Safeguarding Children. Oxford: Wiley and Sons.

Calder, M. & Hackett, S. (eds) (2013) Assessment in Child Care:Using and developing frameworks for practice. Second edition. Dorset: Russell House.

CQC. (2009) Safeguarding Children: A Review of Arrangements in the NHS for Safeguarding Children. London: CQC

DFE (2011) The Munro Review of Child Protection. Final Report. A Child-Centred System. Norwich: TSO

DfES (2003) Every Child Matters Summary. Norwich: TSO

DfES (2004) Every Child Matters: Next Steps

DFE (2011) The Munro Review of Child Protection. Final Report. A Child-Centred System. Norwich: TSO

Department of Health (2000) Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their families. London: The Stationary Office

Department of Health. (2015) What To Do If You Are Worried A Child Is Being Abused: Advice for Practitioners. London: DH.

Department of Health. (2004) The Chief Nursing Officer's review of the nursing, midwifery and health visiting contribution to vulnerable children and young people. London: DH

Doyle, C. & Timms, C (2014) Child Neglect & Emotional Abuse: Understanding Assessment & Reasponse. London: Sage

Doyle, C. (2012) Working with Abused Children. 4th edition. Basingstoke: Palgrave

HM Government (2015) Working Together to Safeguard Children: A Guide to Interagency working to Safeguard and Promote the Welfare of Children. London: TSO

Ferguson, H. (2011) Child protection practice. Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan.

Horwath, J. (2013) Child Neglect: Planning and Intervention. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan

James L. (2009) Mummy Knew. London: Harper Element Ltd

Knowles, G. (2009) Ensuring Every Child Matters. London: Sage

Koubel, G. (2016) Safeguarding adults and Children: Dilemmas and Complex Practice. London: Palgrave

Laming. (2003) The Victoria Climbie Inquiry. London: Parliamentary Report

Lindon, J.(2012) Safeguarding and Child Protection 0-8 Years.4th Ed. London: Hodder Education.

Munro, E. (2008) Effective Child Protection. Second Edition. London: Sage.

Munro, E. (2011) The Munro Review of Child Protection: Final Report, A Child Centred System. London: TSO

Parton, N. (2006) Safeguarding Childhood: Early Intervention and Surveillance in Late Modern Society. Palgrave Macmillan

Rushforth, C. (2012) Safeguarding and Child Protection in Early Years Early Childhood Essential. London: Practical Pre-School Books.

Watson G. & Rodwell, S. (2014) Safeguarding and Protecting Children, Young People & Families: A Guide for Nurses and Midwives. London: Sage

Websites

NSPCC: www.nspcc.org.uk/html/home/home.htm

Barnardos: www.barnardos.org.uk

The Children Act 2004: www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts2004/20040031.htm

12. Guidelines for the Preparation and Submission of Written Assignments:

1. Assignments should be word-processed in Arial or Calibri Light 12 point font, be double-spaced, on A4 size paper. Writing should appear on only one side of the paper, be fully justified and with each page being numbered in the footer, numbering to be centred.

2. There should be a title page detailing the programme, module title, assignment title, student number, marking Tutor and date of submission. Do not put your name on the assignment. It is good practice to put your student number in the top left hand side of the header of each page, and the date of submission in the top right.

3. If there is a word count limit for your programme please include the following text:

Word Count: You are expected to revise and edit your assignment to remain within +/- 10% of the indicative word length outlined. In order to ensure that word counts can easily be checked you should include a note of the word count as identified by your word processing package. A deduction should be made from this figure for all tables, figures, appendices and references which DO NOT count towards the overall word limit.

Students who exceed a specified word limit for a written assessment shall be subject to the following penalty system.

· Up to 10% over the specified word length = no penalty

· 10 – 20% over the specified indicative word length = 5 marks subtracted but if the assessment would normally gain a pass mark, then the final mark to be no lower than the pass mark for the assessment.

· More than 20% over the indicative word length = if the assessment would normally gain a pass mark, then the final mark to be the pass mark for the assessment.

· Assignments shorter than the indicative word length will not have marks deducted (even if these are more than 10% short). However, it is likely to be an exceptional piece of work that covers the assignment requirements fully in much less than the set word count, less 10%.

4. All written work must be referenced using the Harvard System, full details of which are available from the University’s Library website:

http://www.bolton.ac.uk/library/Study-Skills/Referencing/Harvard-Referencing.aspx

5. Unless otherwise notified by your Module Tutor, electronic copies of assignments, saved as a Word document, should be uploaded to the Moodle area for this module. Your Tutor will explain the process. If you experience problems uploading your assignment to the designated area, then you must forward an electronic copy as an attached to your Module Tutor, BEFORE the due deadline. The time you send the email with your assignment as an attachment, will evidence the time the assessment was submitted.

6. Please note that when you submit your work to Moodle, it will automatically be checked for matches against other electronic information. The individual percentage text matches may be used as evidence in an academic misconduct investigation (see Section 13).

7. Submission of assessments may be done on or before the published submission date. Assignments not available at this time will be considered as “late” unless an extension has been previously agreed, with the Programme Leader for your programme.

8. Students who fail to submit assessments by the specified date (without an extension being granted or without accepted Mitigating Circumstances) will be subject to the following penalties:

· Up to 7 calendar days late = 10 marks subtracted but if the assignment would normally gain a pass mark, then the final mark to be no lower than the pass mark for the assignment.

· More than 7 calendar days late = 1 mark will be awarded.

Please note that it is your responsibility to ensure that the assignment is submitted in the format/s specified in the Module Guide or on the Assessment Brief.

YOU SHOULD ALWAYS ENSURE YOU KEEP A COPY OF ANY ASSIGNMENT SUBMITTED BY WHATEVER METHOD

9. In the case of exceptional and unforeseen circumstances, an extension of up to 14 days after the assessment submission deadline may be granted by your Programme Leader, following firstly discussing the problem with the Module Tutor. You should complete an Extension Request Form available from your Tutor and attach documentary evidence of your circumstances, prior to the published submission deadline.

Requests for extensions for periods longer than 14 calendar days must be made using the Mitigating Circumstances procedures.

Requests for extensions which take a submission date past the end of the module (normally week 15) must also be made using the Mitigating Circumstances procedures.

See: https://www.bolton.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/MItigating-Circumstances-Regulations-and-Procedures-2018-19.pdf

Please note that the failure of data storage systems is not considered to be a valid reason for an extension. It is therefore important that you keep multiple copies of your work on different storage devices before submitting it.

Please refer to the Assessment Regulations for further details:

https://www.bolton.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Assessment-Regulations-for-Undergraduate-Programmes-2018-19.pdf

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13. General Assessment Criteria Level HE6

Relevance

Knowledge

Argument/Analysis

Structure

Presentation

Written English

Research/Referencing

Class I (Exceptional

Quality)

85-100%

Directly relevant to title.

Expertly addresses the assumptions of the title and/or the requirements of the brief.

Demonstrates an exceptional knowledge/understanding of theory and practice for this level.

Demonstrates the ability to expertly identify and critically appraise the most important issues, themes and questions.

Demonstrates originality in conceptual understanding.

Makes exceptional use of appropriate arguments and/or theoretical models.

Presents an exceptional critical evaluation of the material results in clear, logical and insightful conclusions.

Demonstrates distinctive or independent thinking.

Coherently articulated and logically structured.

An appropriate format is used.

The presentational style & layout is correct for the type of assignment.

Effective inclusion of figures, tables, plates (FTP).

An exceptionally well written answer with standard spelling and grammar.

Style is clear, resourceful and academic.

Sources accurately cited in the text.

An extensive range of contemporary and relevant references cited in the reference list in the correct style.

Class I (Excellent

Quality)

70-84%

Directly relevant to title.

Addresses the assumptions of the title and/or the requirements of the brief.

Demonstrates an excellent knowledge/understanding of theory and practice for this level.

Demonstrates the ability to identify and critically appraise the most important issues, themes and questions.

Makes creative use of appropriate arguments and/or theoretical models.

Demonstrates some distinctive or independent thinking.

Presents an excellent critical evaluation of the material results in clear, logical and illuminating conclusions.

Coherently articulated and logically structured.

An appropriate format is used.

The presentational style & layout is correct for the type of assignment.

Effective inclusion of figures, tables, plates (FTP).

An excellently written answer with standard spelling and grammar.

Style is clear, resourceful and academic.

Sources accurately cited in the text.

A wide range of contemporary and relevant references cited in the reference list in the correct style.

Class II/i (Very Good Quality)

60-69%

Directly relevant to title.

Addresses most of the assumptions of the title and/or the requirements of the brief.

Demonstrates a very good knowledge/understanding of theory and practice for this level.

Demonstrates the ability to identify and critically appraise key issues, themes and questions.

Uses sound arguments or theoretical models.

Presents a sound critical evaluation of the material resulting in clear and logical conclusions.

Logically constructed in the main.

An appropriate format is used.

The presentational style & layout is correct for the type of assignment.

Effective inclusion of FTP.

A very well written answer with standard spelling and grammar. Style is clear and academic.

Sources accurately cited in the text and a wide range of appropriate references cited in reference list in the correct style.

Class II/ii (Good Quality)

50-59%

Generally addresses the title/brief, but sometimes considers irrelevant issues.

Demonstrates a good knowledge/understanding of theory and practice for this level through the identification and critical appraisal of some key issues, themes and questions.

Presents largely coherent arguments. Evidence of attempted analysis and critical evaluation, with some descriptive or narrative passages.

Conclusions are fairly clear and logical.

For the most part coherently articulated and logically structured.

An acceptable format is used.

The presentational style & layout is correct for the type of assignment.

Inclusion of FTP but lacks selectivity.

Competently written with minor lapses in spelling and grammar. Style is readable and academic in the main.

Most sources accurately cited in the text and an appropriate reference list is provided which is largely in the correct style.

Class III (Satisfactory Quality)

40-49%

Some degree of irrelevance to the title/brief.

Superficial consideration of the issues.

Demonstrates an adequate knowledge/understanding of theory and practice for this level. An attempt is made to critically appraise some key issues, themes and questions.

Presents basic arguments, but focus and consistency lacking in places. Issues are vaguely stated.

Descriptive or narrative passages evident which lack clear purpose. Conclusions are not always clear or logical.

Adequate attempt at articulation and logical structure.

An acceptable format is used.

The presentational style & layout is largely correct for the type of assignment.

Inappropriate use of FTP or not used where clearly needed to aid understanding.

Generally competently written although intermittent lapses in grammar and spelling pose obstacles for the reader.

Style limits communication and is non-academic in a number of places.

Some relevant sources cited.

Some weaknesses in referencing technique.

Borderline

Fail

35-39%

Significant degree of irrelevance to the title/brief.

Only the most obvious issues are addressed at a superficial level and in unchallenging terms.

Demonstrates weaknesses in knowledge of theory and practice for this level. Key issues and themes not identified or appraised.

Limited argument, which is descriptive or narrative in style with little evidence of analysis. Conclusions are neither clear nor logical.

Poorly structured.

Lack of articulation.

Format deficient.

For the type of assignment the presentational style &/or layout is lacking.

FTP ignored in text or not used where clearly needed.

Deficiencies in spelling and grammar makes reading difficult.

Simplistic or repetitious style impairs clarity.

Style is non-academic.

Limited sources and weak referencing.

Fail

<34%

Relevance to the title/brief is intermittent or missing.

The topic is reduced to its vaguest and least challenging terms.

Demonstrates a lack of basic knowledge of either theory or practice for this level, with little evidence of understanding.

Inadequate arguments and no analysis.

Descriptive or narrative in style with no evidence of critique.

Conclusions are sparse.

Unstructured.

Lack of articulation. Format deficient

For the type of assignment the presentational style &/or layout is lacking.

FTP as above.

Poorly written with numerous deficiencies in grammar, spelling and expression.

Style is non-academic.

An absence of academic sources and poor referencing technique.

14. Academic Misconduct and Referencing

Academic misconduct may be defined as any attempt by a student to gain an unfair advantage in any assessment. This includes plagiarism, collusion, commissioning amongst other offences. In order to avoid these types of academic misconduct, you should ensure that all your work is your own and that sources are attributed using the correct referencing techniques. You can also check originality through Turnitin.

Please note that penalties apply if academic misconduct is proven. See the following link for further details:

https://www.bolton.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Academic-Misconduct-Regulations-and-Procedures-2018-19.pdf

15. Assessments

Module Number and Name:

Assessment Number 1: Essay (100%)

Assessment Title: Critically analyse and justify your professional role in identifying and responding to children affected by one category of child abuse with reference to research, policy, practice and legal issues. In addition to this suggest and critically analyse how partnership working can inhibit and facilitate your professional role with regard to your chosen category

Assessment Length: 4000 words

Submission Deadline: 7th January, 2019 by midnight via turnitin

Learning Outcomes:

1 Demonstrate in-depth knowledge and critical awareness the concept of safeguarding children

Assessment 1

2 Critically analyse and critically evaluate definitions, indicators & signs of child abuse

Assessment 1

3 Critically apply the policies that underpin your role in the recognition of and response to child abuse

Assessment 1

4 Critically analyse the factors that inhibit and assist partnership working when safeguarding children, suggesting how safeguarding practice may be enhanced.

Assessment 1

Assignment Brief:

Please ensure that you spend time reading round, planning and organising your work. Please visit the study skills site available via a direct link on the Safeguarding Children Moodle site. Structure your work in an assignment format with an introduction, main body and conclusion.

Introduction:

In the opening paragraph refer directly to the aim of the assignment to focus the reader. Identify what you are going to cover in the order you intend to cover it in. This should constitute one paragraph. In the next paragraph introduce your topic by defining key terms. Remember quotations are useful but descriptive so do try to critically analyse and evaluate definitions to maximise your mark. Subsequent paragraphs in the introduction may be used to give relevant statistics or other elements of the background / context to your topic. A robust rationale may fit within the introduction or if you prefer, this may be presented in the main body of the assignment. When giving a rationale try to find policies and statements that support your rationale at global, national, professional and local levels and present them in that order moving from the macro to the micro. A good introduction usually constitutes around 10% of the word count.

Main body:

Remember that the first paragraph relates to the first idea, topic, theme or sub theme that you said you would cover in your introduction. Each paragraph should cover an idea, topic, theme or sub theme that is relevant in some way to the title and assessment criteria. Try to keep to the order that you said you would cover in your introduction. Each paragraph should contain referenced critical discussion and should end with a statement that sums up what that discussion means in respect of the assessment criteria as they apply to the title. Don’t be afraid to use the words in the title and assessment criteria to demonstrate to those assessing your work that you are on track and answering the question. Avoid both very short and long rambling paragraphs which indicate a lack of critical discussion and unfocussed discussion respectively. It may be a good idea to work out roughly how many words you want to allocate to each criteria. You need to aim for a balance within your work but may feel that you can clearly evidence some criteria in fewer words than others. In order to pass the module you must clearly evidence each element of each assessment criteria at level HE6.

Write critically:

Use opening phrases: First, first of all, to begin, first and foremost, initially; at the outset

Use reporting verbs: suggest, argue, claim, propose, think, describe, note, analyse, discuss, show, explain, point out, demonstrate, report and develop

Demonstrate similarities in evidence (compare): equally, likewise, in the same way, indeed, correspondingly, in the same line

Reinforce: in addition, furthermore, moreover, indeed, what is more, neither, nor, not only

Present alternative evidence: alternatively, a different perspective on this.., others argue that.., it might be argued that..,

Rebut alternative evidence: however, on the other hand, nevertheless, in any case, despite this, in spite of this, even though

Demonstrate differences in evidence (Contrast): in contrast, on the other hand, conversely, in fact

Quotations:

Try to avoid using too many direct quotes as they are descriptive, so therefore use quotations sparingly and only as a basis for critical analytical or evaluative discussion. Remember that direct quotes of < 3 lines should be denoted by speech marks whilst direct quotes of 3 lines or more should be clearly indented and italicised. In all cases all sources must be clearly cited and page numbers provided for all direct quotes.

Conclusion:

A good conclusion will succinctly describe what your assignment has covered (in the order you covered it in) and found (your findings are those summing up statements at the end of paragraphs). There should be no new material in the conclusion and it should not be necessary to reference anything. The conclusion should clearly link to the assignment title and should constitute around 10% of the total word count.

Writing in the first or third person:

Academic convention favours writing in the third person. This is a useful discipline. It assists the writer to stand back from the subject matter and take an objective and analytical approach without being distracted by personal opinion or diversions into anecdotal evidence of little relevance.

On the other hand when [I am] analysing one’s [my] practice, it seems artificial to deny [my] personal involvement in what is written [I am writing] and it is stylistically awkward to refer to oneself [myself] as ‘the writer’ or ‘the author’ rather than ‘I’ or ’me’. Choice of the use of first or third person is a subject for debate (Webb, 1992). In relation to writing reflectively, it is reasonable [to me!] to use the first person voice when writing about oneself [myself] or one’s [my] practice, but to try to avoid the pitfalls indicated above and to retain the analytical approach which third person writing encourages.

Reference

Webb C (1992) The use of the first person in academic writing: objectivity, language and gate keeping. Journal of Advanced Nursing 17 (6): 747-52.

Referencing:

You will be introduced to the skills of accurate referencing. All written work must be referenced and cited properly using the Harvard System, details of which are available from the library or online at How to Cite Harvard Style

The Library also provides a number of Study Skills Booklets

Secondary Research- It is expected that the Reference List will contain between 15 and 20 sources. As a MINIMUM the Reference List should include 4 referenced academic journals and 5 academic books.

Specific Assessment Criteria

First class (70%+): This piece of work shows evidence of wider research with reference to a number of differing academic viewpoints. The essay has recognised relevantly and discussed in detail, all the required external environmental factors which affect the management operation of mega events.  Several reasoned and logical arguments have been developed well and supported by a wide range of appropriately researched literature. Reference to two or more academic models is clear, relevant and informative. Presentation is of a high standard, and in the appropriate essay style.  The high number of appropriate sources has been referenced accurately and to a high standard.

 

Second class (50-69%): A clear and informative piece of work with evidence of wider research and discussion. The essay has correctly recognised and discussed, all the required external environmental factors which affect the management operation of mega events.  Some reasoned arguments have been developed and supported by a good number of sources.  Reference to two academic models is clear.  Presentation is of a good standard, in the appropriate essay style.  A good number of appropriate sources have been referenced well, with most complying with the Harvard style.

 

Third class (40-49%): A reasonable attempt has been made at researching the essay but greater in depth discussion and academic debate is required.  The essay has recognised the external environmental factors which affect the management operation of mega events, however mostly the discussion is superficial and lacking in any depth.  Reference to two academic models has been attempted.  Presentation of the essay is limited, and Only the minimum of 5 sources has been provided, with at least one academic text and two academic journals included. 

 

Fail: Students who do not meet the requirements of a third class grade will not successfully complete the assessment activity.

 

Please also see Section 13 for General Assessment criteria.

Submission Instructions:

See Section 12 Guidelines for the Preparation and Submission of written coursework, which will give you details on how to submit your work electronically. You are required to submit only electronic copies of your written assessments, unless your Module Tutor advises you otherwise.

Advice:

· Do not cut and paste phrases or paragraphs from published sources. You should seek to use your own words to explain concepts and theory.

· If you wish to refer to specific quotes from published sources then you must use full Harvard presentation. See BISSTO for clear guidance.

· Do not share work with other students.

Specific Assignment Guidance

The rationale for the topic could be given here. Give the rationale in this order:

Global

National

Professional (Your professional role should be stated)

Local

At each of the above levels the statements have been underpinned with references from a variety of appropriate sources

Relate your work back to the question and the learning outcomes, try and not go off on another path. Have your learning outcomes next to you whilst you are writing / typing (to keep on task).

You will gain more marks if you write less descriptively and include more supporting references and evidence to the statements that you make.

If your work tells a long story it is too descriptive for level 6 work and requires critical analysis

Provide critical analysis by including authors with an alternative viewpoint and critical analyse the differences

Try to provide any counterarguments to the statements that you make.

You will gain more marks if you evaluate the quality of the literature/ evidence that you cited in the text e.g. what is better / more rigorous evidence (a newspaper article or a government guidance report?)

To illustrate your increased knowledge in your topic you need to reflect on and evaluate the application to your practice/ setting

The reflective thinking process is about linking together the concepts you have mentioned in the literature with the reality of implementing them into practice (policy, law, serious case reviews). Write about your role and your personal development by reflecting inwards and how this can change your concept of the role in relation to safeguarding and your chosen category i.e thinking about yourself and how your thinking, attitudes, knowledge has changed and how this has influenced your practice.